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. do not vote for any incumbent, period. host: we are two years out from the next election. you say if this thing does not work, star of the campaign not to vote of the incumbents? caller: start it now. start the campaign now. they want to start campaigning earlier and earlier, we as the american people need to send a message now that if you cannot do it, if you cannot do your job, then we do not want you there. host: john in south carolina on the line for democrats. caller: the morning. listen very carefully. some of these people, they are all about money. ever since they are in office, some more against him. if i was the president and they do not do their job, i would come to the american people and say, listen, let's spend enough money to pay ourselves out of debt and start from scratch. all of those jobs will come back from china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video
the government, the government suggested you can have our election with them are in the class, and they did a film, and it's absolutely priceless. i mean, the parents, they didn't have to do it because the teachers were not shy to do it. they would make this mistake or that little thing and they would have this comical elements but the students got interested. they got interested. they ended up collecting a monitor. i'm how good the monitor was. but it was all right. it was all right. and so there are ways i think, which are more likely to think of that i am. of taking these different ideas and say try to settle here or try it out over there. you are building the bar, and it's true that there are, none of these things, everything has its drawbacks. move along. >> final two questions. this gentleman right here, and back their. >> ninety. i've been involved in studying practicing chinese law for the last 45 years. i just want to say on a positive note you, justice breyer and also i think others talked and plenty differently which about changing a legal culture in china. and it wanted to menti
closer election. but people took it personal and i think it really became a tipping point. >> and to take something from people that was earned and gained with such sack ra fiesz. . >> now it's time for a light ning round. quick answers, please. you hear me, richard? the spot light award. this revvie gos to the movement that defined the 2012 campaign. >> it has to be the 47% video. >> health care law up head. >> hitrichard? >> sandy. >> i'd have to go 47%. that was the moment. >> no question, 47%. so that's the one that got so far, the most consensus. we have a lot more to k078. stick around, we'll be right back. >> first, earlier today, the revvie was awarded for best musical performance. the nominees were. ♪ ♪ for purple mountains majesty ♪ above the fruited plain . ♪ i'm so in love with you >> and the revvie went to governor chris christie. congratulations, governor. the revvies will be right back. ? how do you measure happiness?] by the armful? by the barrelful? the carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy
or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a sch
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
the people who aren't willing to make a compromise. >> this is something we know that our elected leader haves to get done and don't have hope for getting something done is on gun control in this country, although the conversation still wages on. fresh in the news is the fact that four firefighters were basically used as target practice for this person in webster, new york. two were shot and killed on christmas eve in upstate new york. there's the suspect right there. william spangler spent time in prison for murdering his grandmother. he shouldn't be access to weapons at all. police say that he left a note behind saying he was doing what he liked to do best, killing. they think in the burned remains to find his sister. they have found human remains but they haven't said whether or not it is his spangler's sister or lot. lynn, the fact that we're talking about this, do we do it now through the prism of newtown? he had also a weapon, the ar-15 rifle, one of the weapons that spangler used. do we look at it through the prism of newtown? >> newtown, virginia tech, columbine, northern illinoi
apart. many republicans feel they were elected under a pledge not to raise taxes no matter what. democrats were elected under a pledge that everyone over a quarter million dollars has to have their taxes locked in. once we come back, actually right now talks are going on right now i'm sure between the staffs of the speaker and the white house. it is not as if nothing has been done. if people want a deal they can have it. if not, it can be difficult. i say it is 50/50. >> one thing you have been following are the hearings on libya. hillary clinton, secretary of state has a virus, a con cuss, and wasn't -- a concussion and wasn't able to testify. at this point, what do you think we will learn from the secretary that we are not learning from these hearings? is libya something that will stay with her should she decide to have a run next go around? >> of all of the members on the cabinet, i think secretary clinton is probably the most able and has done the best job. obviously she has questions to answer in benghazi. the report was accurate. i don't believe it did reach her. she has a
united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only enhance the quality. one example from north carolina riva group ventures who want to influence the state legislature on a bill prepared a bunch of model commercials that destroyed members of the legislature. when a gc comment had nothing to do a type of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up
was thinking slower-elect, you know what i'm saying? >> remember this humble moment. [laughter] say that one more time. >> what does it mean to you personally [inaudible] -- >> i think what it means to me personally is that 18 years ago the city of charleston county county-wide gave me an opportunity to represent him based on values and issues. a couple of years later the folks from the house gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and their values. two years ago the first district gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and values. what i've not ever heard on the campaign trail was besides the fact that you're black or because you're black, here's what we want to do. they've asked me questions about values and issues, and that's an amazing thing. i think it speaks to the evolution of south carolina and of our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people in our nation and specifically of our state. i would say this -- more importantly than the complexion that i have, i think back to growing up in a single-parent household. i'd love to speak to the single moms out there
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
circumstances. >> this is outside of the book but i will do it anyway because i've been doing general election for the times. talking to jim messina the campaign manager of the obama campaign and david axelrod and rahm emanuel and stephanie cutter and asking them you know, how would the next years under obama, given that the house composition -- >> is almost certainly going to be similar. >> how will things be different and uniformly their answer, in other words the talking point, was that the fever will break, that the american people if they vote for president obama for another four years will basically be voting against obstructionist and the republicans will get the message and they will walk in a sultry fashion toward the center of. >> i can see that happening at all. >> no, no and if that is her talking point and they are siding with the. >> are you optimistic to say that governor romney would have one that there is and you waiting for him after he gets into office? >> no, no i'm not and i wrote a story for "the new york times magazine" on governor romney and specifically on his kind of
elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i look forward to him doing better. host: one thing that stands out as far as his accomplishments. caller: bringing the end to osama bin laden. i think he has done very well. he has been patient and the adult for working with the republicans that tried to make everything for the country. host: president obama amongst others being listed this morning from the phones and facebook and twitter. after thestory passing of senator daniel in a the washington times." host: the code of hawaii -- the governor of hawaii possibly been the replacement for daniel inouye, reported by cbs news. picking up on the remaining time and before the next senate, comes in. president obama spoke on friday and talked about the senator's service and h
finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this
for reelection. first elected in 1993 she served three turned in the u.s. senate and will be succeeded by newly elected senator ted cruise. on wednesday senator hutchison gave her farewell speech. it is half an hour. >> i rise today to address this chamber for possibly the last time a senior senator from the great state of texas. i have to say it is an ironic note that if i had given my farewell address last week, there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capital ringing with laughter and anticipation of our season's happiest time. but in just one weekend a sadness has set in with the news of a massacre of innocent children in newtown, conn. followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with heavy heart for those that have been lost in the last few days. i do want to thank the people of texas for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both benches on both sides of this room are filled with
conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. no one thinks byrd can replace mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could replace lyndon johnson. that is certain the way things work. as my book starts, the first chapter is about byrd. it is entitled "the grind." he is hard-wo
for election. everybody else is pretty much locked in whether we go over the cliff or not. is it thelma and louuisuise or laverne and shirley? they all place their bets a year-and-a-half ago. the election decided it. host: thank you for the call. bill has this point. we are down to the wire in terms of negotiations. jackie is joining us from georgia. caller: good morning. i cannot believe i got through. i have been trying for so long. host: thank you for being persistent. caller: the guy from the newspaper is wrong. we are not stupid. we know what is going on. i am 71 years old. i'm so worried about going down and being a third-world country. john boehner has to get his act together. he is not worried about anything. and the tea party -- give me a break. they are not worried about anything but taking us down. i still cannot believe i got to talk to you guys. thank you for listening. if obama could run again, i would vote for him again. he wants to do something. the republicans do not. if a republican was in the white house, there would not be any worry about paying for sandy, unemployme
ten moments of an election year is like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. there are an impossible number of possibilities. there are the moments when catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business, you didn't build that. >> i like being able to fire people who provide services to me. >> when cast members stole the spotlight. >> i'm an american woman who us contraception. let's start there. >> almost like an etch a sketch, you can shake it up and we start all over again. >> a fair number of moments ranging from ridiculous to explicable. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romnesia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> so many moments so much nonsense. but there were moments that shook up the race or made history and made our top ten list. >> it was seen at the time as a proxy race for november. wisconsin's republican governor scott walker in a showdown with organized labor over budget cuts and collective bargaining power. turns out the end result was no bellwether for the presidential race. walker w
't understand how these people cannot do their jobs that they're elected to. so i'm wondering what's your take on what's going on in washington? you're sitting in washington. >> right. the at least we have bipartisan agreement it's all nuts, right? everyone agrees this is ridiculous and in spite of what they say, they've been talking about it for months and years and there was ample talk about what a framework should be through the election, which wasn't that long ago. there's plenty of debate. to tie the two stories we have been talking wiabout together, there was a colin powerful doctrine that general schwartzkopf executed so well in the first gulf war. which was have an exit strategy and using overwhelming force. this congress had an exit strategy. they had the idea of overwhelming force, and they set themselves these limits. if they got through this deadline the pain would be so great on themself -- this is self-imposed -- they would find a way out. they have not executed their own strategy and been able to vote for their own leadership. what you have in washington just to take a step back
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and the question is whether it can support enough growth in the economy. >> paul: taxes are going up, we know that, spending, going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially re
any doubt in my mind. there are looking at the election of 2014 and 2006 to more than the people. thank you for your time. pfft host: good morning to you, elmer. what is your level of optimism heading into 2013? caller: i am kind of scared. the statement i went to bed, why do we not get in contact with george bush. i think he should be in here on the deal because it was him and that got us in this position we are in. he cannot even tolerate position said they have going on with our congress. if the people out here for us to be taking care of, if they have enough money to take over to another country the way they demonstrate, that is what we are in this position that we are in. i think we should get in contact with george bush and see if he can get us out of this. host: here is a piece in "the washington post." if there is a photo of the first couple greeting military personnel. this is the president remained largely out of sight golfing and spending time with his family. he left washington late on friday. a little progress has been made on the cliff talks, but at least the talkin
presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year period of sun belt dominance. and there were issues that are critical in the politics that develop, that came out of the sun belt. they tended to have a conservative task to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt, in the south and southwest that we see the rise of what we see by the 1970s is becoming to talk about as the religious right, the rise of evangelical involved in the clinical process in new and important ways. so thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in
up the news of this holiday. then, part two of our conversation about upcomingin elections: house races in illinois and south carolina, an high-profile politics in new jersey. we have two health stories. first, are annual mammogramswn necessary? betty ann bowser examines theil conflicting answers.or >> it's going to result in an excessive treatment required for people that delay getting their cancer detected.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity meas
election, there were people around the president of the united states with assault rifles. we put people in schools with the guns, what happens if there in the restroom and somebody breaks and from the front? how are they going to protect the children? how many children do we have to lose? host: thanks for the call -- let me share with you this photograph from "the new york daily news." a handful of students tried to flee and lanza shot teem. some of the other fallen students are in the photograph. because of the teacher process protection, most of her students survived a car. -- survived a the horror. asheville, north carolina, republican line. caller: i would like to say one thing and i think there is a connection that people are overlooking -- i think people especially recently and as far back as timothy mcveigh and the people who crashed into the tent -- twin towers, they are terrorists. terrorist attacks society by creating fear, mayhem, and everything else. is the united states overlooking this? are we creating terrorists? beene young people have t attacking people with assault rif
ultimately burned seven homes. the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbsd on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today as the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s.-allied countries also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria.in in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan, killing 27in people, including the country's head of border security.ll the russian-made aircraft went down near the southern city of shymkent. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash, but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy
election at the top, clearly. but there were other compelling stories inside and outside that campaign that made indelible remarks. re here's candy crowley's top ten. >> reporter: picking the top ten moments of an election year is like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. there are an impossible number of possibilities. there are the moments when catch phrases become boomera eeboomer. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like to fire people who don't provide services to me. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception, let's start there. >> like an etch-a-sketch, shake it up and start all over moment. >> reporter: and ridiculous to ine inexplicab inexplicable. >> i'm not going to shut up. i think it's my turn. >> i think it's called romnesia. >> i think it'sobamaogna. >> there are moments that made the top ten list. it was scene at the time as a proxy race for november. wisconsin's republican governor scott walker in a showdown with organized labor over budget cuts and collective bargaining power. turns out the end result was no bell weather for the pres
you were happy to do that so close to an election when some might say politically that wasn't the best thing to do. >> this is much more important than any election, piers. this is the livelihood of the people in my state when the president does this evenings that deserve praise, i will give him praise. when the president does things that deserve scorn, i will give him scorn. people know that about me. i am not going to play politics with this issue. this is so much bigger than an election. this is the livelihood of the people of my state. people expect me to get the job done. when they ask me a question, i give an honest answer. how has the president been on this? he's been great. >> this killed ambassador christopher stevens, the country's terrorism chief now says it was a terrorist attack. >> clearly the death of ambassador christopher stevens continues to reverberate and the truth or otherwise of the circumstances leading up to his death seem to be pretty vague to put it mildly. where do you think we are with this? >> well, let me tell you what's not vague and that is five days aft
've had the opportunity working with their folks in their states and all around the country, to elect some new people to the senate that are bringing the right ideas and some new voices to those principles that we know have made our country successful. and so i feel like as i leave the senate that we are leaving it better than we found it and that our focus now, despite the difficult challenges, is really on america and how we turn america around. i should spend a lot of time and most of my time on thanking my staff. i have to say that my greatest inspirations have come from the staff that i've had the opportunity to serve with in the house and the senate. as all of you know who are serving here in the senate, this country is being run by people in their 20's and 30's who get us so busy that they're having to follow us to meetings to tell us where we're going and what we'll be talking about. but it's incredible to see that these young people, particularly those that i've served with, have such a passion for our country and freedom, and they're willing to put it all on the baseline to make
, no one is coming behind him and senator mcconnell, the republican leader of the senate is up for re-election and as we saw in the senate race in kentucky a few years ago, he may have to worry about a challenge from the right if he supports a tax increase. i think president obama is doing the only sane thing he can, which is reach out to the speaker and he controls the house and, that is -- and the good news for the president is the public seems by all the polls, by the fact the election came out the way it did, to be in his corner, not the speaker's. >> rick: the president -- you want to weigh in on that? >> i just -- >> rick: americans are in favor of raising taxes on the wealthiest americans and, the president did win, november 6th. >> we have seen polls that say that, they approve tax reform and want to see real entitlement reform and want to get spending under control. but, president obama has failed to bring anything up to the -- on the table, and, especially the democrats, they have been silently on entitlement reform and silent on the spending cuts and as we know, we can talk about ra
it to the congress. the outcome of the election came before my book came out. but i was worried and i thought it was a legitimate concern in the senate should know about it. he said don't worry. he said you know, everybody knows that my father had an affair. and he said i know my father wasn't anti-semite. whatever you find whatever you rate is going to be sure for the man i knew and loved them without their. so i said okay. i want full access to everything. i want full access to the family, two of the documents, to everything stored it became belaboring boston but spend close to researchers. and you will see the book come to you in the family and your lawyers and representatives will see the book when it is between hard covers, not before. i won't be coming back to you for permission to cite anything. whatever i find them going to use in the book. he said okay. then it took 18 months to get the solid writing and i was off and running. and i found some more remarkable story that i even imagined i would find. i found the story of a man who spent his life moving back and forth have been an outs
not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were able to work together that way, crossing party lines, crossing with the id administration wanted done or what the caucus leadership on both sides wanted done, it showed we had a certain independence. i will never forget the late senator robert sitting in an office with us all together, sobbing, saying, we saved the sen
did and many members of our caucus lost their election because of that. they live in areas which just -- they understood when they took that vote that it was over. including jack brooks. king in his district, but as chairman of the committee, he saw the need to bring that bill to the floor and he lost his election, as strong as he was in this that district. after the election, members came and he said i would do it again. i would do it again. how unimportant is my political life compared to saving the lives of -- and for 10 years, there was no -- there was a ban on assault weapons. and for 10 years, you didn't see this regular demonstration of violence in this high capacity way. when we were no longer in a position to renew it, that became clear, we started to see the violence escalate in the past decade because you know it expired in 2004. i just would like to say if you would like to say something about how you saw things in the aftermath, because i think they are asking about then and now and the change. >> congress has not acted or been able to act post 1984. >> listen. i was not
been an election and house republicans are only one part of of washington right now. >> and the president is only one part. the republicans actually passed a budget that -- not a budget, not just a budget but a budget plan that goes out through the year, gives you entitlement reform and pro-growth tax reform and doesn't have to raise taxes, the left wants to raise taxes but you don't have to balance the budget. they have a plan. they've passed it and got re-elected having done that. the senate got re-elected because they never voted on anything. only way they were able to get re-elected. haven't put something forward and the president's plan was an outline that the house and senate voted against. you can't vote you have a mandate when your own party voted against it. >> katrina. >> there was an election. americans voted very clearly for a sense of different priorities than grover norquist has stood for. one was that the richest in this country paid their fair share and i also resist very strongly matthew dowd with the good band-aid and all but what he said about the
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
will begin to define his second term. he was elected to lead. we can still avoid going over the fiscal cliff if the president and the democrat- controlled senate step forward this week to solve this problem. >> we also talked to washington post reporter lori montgomery for an update on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> what kind of a deal did the president offer, and what is new in the negotiations among the senators and between the senators and the white house? >> it does not appear to be anything new. the policies they're talking about are the same policies that have been on the table for weeks and weeks. what is new is that they seem to have finally agreed they're going to move forward with something. there is no guarantee that the republican leader and the democratic leader will be able to put together an agreement. at least they are now saying they will try to do it. they're working together and aiming towards a vote either late sunday or monday. >> what is the scuttlebutt among the rank-and-file senators about whether or not they're going to be able to pull this off before the end of t
's very clear now, mr. president, that the speaker's number one goal is to get elected speaker on january 3rd. the house is not even here. he's told me he'll give them two days to get back here, 48 hours, not two days, 48 hours. they don't even have enough of the leadership here to meet to talk about it. they've done it with conference calls. people are spread all over this country because the speaker is basically waiting for january 3rd. now, the president campaigned on raising taxes on people making more than $250 thou,000 a year. the bush tax cut will expire at the end of this year. obama was elected with a surplus of about three million votes. he won the election. he campaigned on this issue. again, the speaker can't take yes for an answer. the president has presented to him something that would prevent us from going over the cliff. it was response to something that the speaker gave them himself but i guess with the dysfunctional republican caucus in the house, even the speaker can't tell what they are going to do because he backed off even his own proposal. the house, we hear so ofte
like us who are using data to talk about the election. it says quote, breaking, to surprise a sun dit the best system for determining which of two things is wiser. we posted these charts and a bunch of others. i'll tweet a link to them. that does it for tonight. and now it is time for the last word.i. . >>> right now on first look -- d-day for president obama and congressional leaders. automatic tax cuts and smaller paychecks hang in the balance. american military hero, four-star general known as stormin' norman schwarzkopf has died. >>> a fiscal milk cliff is looming. bears over the bruins in the holiday bowl. >>> good morning, even as the finger pointing continues on capitol hill this morning, new hope on a deal to avoid that fiscal cliff. president obama will be meeting with congressional leaders later today. danielle leigh joins us. >> that meeting in many ways a last opportunity for the president and congressional leaders to reach a deal and get something done before this year is over. if this meeting is unsuccessful it could seal this country's fate, as some developments yesterd
of tax increases obama and the democrats passed before th be last election and 90% of those tax hikes were delayed, conveniently. the president got himself safelyse reelected.ion and then we have the massive spending, $8 trillion in debt obama is running up over the next decade. republicans have several schools. right now they have very little leverage onra this debate over e fiscal cliff because that stuff happens automatically, but the idea of a debt ceiling increasef they told obama more than once if you want a trillion dollars, you will need that eight times in the next decade they will have to cut spending a trillion have to cut spending a trillion eric: i'm a republican, congressman, senator tax pledge to not raise taxes. teo if somebody approaches me and says here is a bill that says if youhi sign this we will cut taxn for 98%, how can you say no to that? my point is this. the administration is winning the war of optics. if they played it this way, do they not win? >> they won the war of optics so far because everything has beene done. done inside closed walls.nd f if c-span, f
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